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Effie briest

Effie Briest Literatur­klassiker

Effi Briest ist ein Roman von Theodor Fontane, der von Oktober bis März in sechs Folgen in der Deutschen Rundschau abgedruckt wurde, bevor er als Buch erschien. Effi Briest ist ein Roman von Theodor Fontane, der von Oktober bis März in sechs Folgen in der Deutschen Rundschau abgedruckt wurde, bevor er. Fontane Effi Briest (vollständiger Titel: Fontane Effi Briest oder Viele, die eine Ahnung haben von ihren Möglichkeiten und ihren Bedürfnissen und trotzdem das. Der jährige Baron von Innstetten, Landrat in Kessin in Hinterpommern, hält um die Hand der jährigen Effi Briest an. Die Mutter redet Effi zu, den Antrag. Effi Briest (Große Klassiker zum kleinen Preis, Band 8) | Fontane, Theodor | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und.

effie briest

Effi Briest ist ein Roman von Theodor Fontane. Wir geben eine Inhaltsangabe von Effi Briest und Informationen zu Epoche, Autor und Werk. Der jährige Baron von Innstetten, Landrat in Kessin in Hinterpommern, hält um die Hand der jährigen Effi Briest an. Die Mutter redet Effi zu, den Antrag. Effi Briest ist ein Roman von Theodor Fontane, der von Oktober bis März in sechs Folgen in der Deutschen Rundschau abgedruckt wurde, bevor er als Buch erschien. Effi Briest ist ein Roman von Theodor Fontane. Wir geben eine Inhaltsangabe von Effi Briest und Informationen zu Epoche, Autor und Werk. Ein Höhe- und Wendepunkt des poetischen Realismus: Die siebzehnjährige Effi von Briest heiratet den früheren Verehrer ihrer Mutter, Baron von Innstetten, und​. Neben Anna Karenina und Madame Bovary gehört Effi Briest zu den berühmtesten Frauengestalten und Ehebrecherinnen der Weltliteratur. Die deutsche. Jahre später entdeckt ihr Ehemann Instetten Briefe und fordert Crampas zum Duell. 'Effi Briest' ist Fontanes berühmtester Roman. Thomas Mann zählte ihn zu den. Am Anfang der Geschichte steht die Verlobung zwischen Baron von Innstetten, einem Freund der Familie von Briest, und deren Tochter Effi. Diese folgt dem mehr.

Considered to be his greatest novel, this is a humane, unsentimental portrait of a young woman torn between her duties as a wife and mother and the instincts of her heart.

Hugh Rorrison's clear, modern translation is accompanied by an introduction by Helen Chambers, which compares Effi with other literary heroines such as Emma Bovary and Anna Karenina.

Theodor Fontane was a German novelist and potitical reporter. Along with Effi Briest , Fontane is remembered for Frau Jenny Treibel , an ironic criticism of middle-class hypocrisy and small-mindedness.

Get A Copy. Paperback , Penguin Classics , pages. Published November 18th by Penguin Books Ltd first published More Details Original Title.

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Jun 25, Lisa rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-to-read-before-you-die. I remember passionately identifying with Effi Briest when I was a young girl.

Telling establishment to go to hell - secretly or not - was a sign of inner independence. Conventional marriage - bah, humbug! Follow your heart, live your life your own way, make your decisions accordingly.

Fast forward, twenty-five years later. Do I still identify with Effi? And no Unfortunately, my ol I remember passionately identifying with Effi Briest when I was a young girl.

Unfortunately, my older self has come to believe that strong feelings are no guarantee for happiness either, especially not the ones you engage in when you are a young teenager experiencing sexual love and desire for the first time.

Do I think Effi should try to live up to the expectations of her old, conventional, socially suitable husband then? What would I tell my younger Effi-self if I had the chance?

Don't marry young. Try different things. Explore life. Choose a partner later when you are able to make a proper decision based both on attraction and common values.

Does that mean Effi Briest couldn't have got it right at all, either way, in her time and place?

It is hard enough now, despite the incredible progress we have made regarding women's choice and freedom. Would I like my daughter to identify with Effi?

As a literary heroine, she is as sweet as they get. As a role model for young girls today, quite unsuitable. There must be more, not less, rebellious joie de vivre in young women of the 21st century!

View all 41 comments. This is a book in which everybody gets what they wanted, whether they like it or not.

The eponymous heroine gets to marry a man of principals, her husband gets to marry somebody who he thinks presumably is just like her mother who he had wanted to marry twenty years earlier and Major Crampas gets to die in combat just as he always wanted.

Social Stricture Fontane prefers to tell simple stories and Effi Briest is no exception. The plot is very simple and loosely based on a true story, the strength This is a book in which everybody gets what they wanted, whether they like it or not.

The plot is very simple and loosely based on a true story, the strength of the story is in the author's craftsmanship. Every detail seems to count and becomes meaningful.

A simple tale of the breakdown of a marriage illustrates a small minded and self destructive culture.

As in Die Poggenpuhls members of the upper classes are like so many colourful butterflies caught in Fontane's net and pinned to the page.

Their world shifts from the secure to the claustrophobic view spoiler [ as indeed one might expect life to be inside the killing jar hide spoiler ].

Effi marries the man who wanted to marry her mother, her husband in turn is is close to being twenty years older than her.

There is a road map, but does it lead to anywhere that anyone would really like to go? Effi's marriage at seventeen to a much older man echoes her mother's early marriage to an older man.

One life is an iteration of the other. The other cycle in the book is that of the natural year. Effi and her daughter areborn in the summer.

While the October marriage and arrival in November in the new home are shrouded in autumnal atmosphere with a promise of a bleak winter to come.

The news of Innstetten's promotion comes at the end of winter, so the prospect of a new life in Berlin is offers the hope of a springlike renewal to Effi's life.

A Glance over the Literary Landscape Since Effi's travelling companion is reading Zola's Nana when the news comes of the breakdown of her marriage it seems natural to compare this failed marriage novel with some of the others that if not Fontane then his reading audience would be familiar with to bring out some of the distinctive features of Fontane's approach.

The social code is far stricter in Fontane's book this is above all a Prussian story! Madame Bovary , as far as I recall aspired to a romantic vision of decadent upper class life, while Effi is stuck in the reality of an upper class existence that is intolerant and restrictive, the decadence of the Eulenburg Affair is fasr from her daily experience.

Madame Bovary's reading has primed her for a life of voluptuous dissipation, while Effi who never gets to have the full or adult version of her name, instead is forever a Katie and never a Catherine is characterised by her lack of reading and poor education, her consistent reference point is what her old Pastor said.

While in both Tolstoy and Fontane the theme of adultery ends in the woman's death, for Tolstoy this is the result of the woman's choice.

She has abandoned her role in the family, and with the aid of further emphatically non-Russian Western decadence in the form of drugs and steam trains she meets her death.

Effi is, by contrast, the passive element in the story. Things happen to her and are imposed on her. Her husband's actions, governed by a principled moral code, lead to her being ostracised and the extent of her ostracism is determined by the degree to which society shares or conforms to her husband Innstetten's values.

However Effi has the final word. She thought at the age of seventeen that those principles of his were manly, but comes to realise that that are simply small minded and perhaps those two categories aren't mutually exclusive.

Despite this she is able to transcend her society and forgive him, whether that is helpful or meaningful beyond establishing something about her character is another question, in a sense, as a social novel, her forgiving him is a shocking act.

In this type of novel, from this type of society, we are used to expecting that the "fallen" woman is the one in need of forgiveness and isn't the one who provides the forgiveness.

Little Effi is the still centre of the book and one leaves with the feeling that it is Innstetten who needed her more than Effi needed him.

Here Effi Briest seems to me to be very close to Tess of the d'Urbervilles. Although socially the two books are in completely different worlds the sense of a dominant morally that is pre-Christian and simply vindictive is shared through the imagery of human sacrifice.

Stonehenge in Hardy is the counterpoint of the sacrifice stones that Effi sees in North Germany. She assumes that they are Wendish in origin ie Slav and not German , but, and Effi's poor education is a constant theme in the story, she is corrected towards the close of the novel Ach, gnäd'ge Frau verzeihen.

Aber das waren ja keine Wenden. Das mit den Opfersteinen und mit dem Herthasee das war ja schon wieder viel, viel früher, ganz vor Christum natum; reine Germanen, von denen wir alle abstammen The sacrifice stones are 'purely German' and the characters in the novel are the descendants of those Germans who at various foolish points in German history have been lauded as good role models - Fontane is the antidote to that kind of thinking and so is the Grand Old Man of Prussian letters.

While Nana , and Madame Bovary weigh in with leading women who are intrinsically destructive and disruptive to the social order, in Fontane it is the social order itself that is destructive with the potential to crush the joy out of life, and the life out of the individual.

The novelist as Craftsman One can see the influence of this novel on Thomas Mann's style in Buddenbrooks.

This struck me particularly in the Twenty-eighth chapter which deals with the duel between Innstetten and Crampas. Rather like some of the chapters in Buddenbrooks this could have been a free standing short story.

The references to earlier events are self explanatory. Innstetten's return to Kessin in bright sunshine contrasting to his earlier arrival with Effi after their honeymoon on a gloomy November day.

The efficiency of the description of the actual combat, terse, in stark contrast to the longer description of Crampas' death.

The irony of his last words. The lack of emotion in the scene contrasted with the letter that closes the chapter in which Innstetten's Second describes visiting Crampas' widow and explaining to her that she is now, in fact, a widow.

The dryness of the stripped down style itself a blow to any reader expecting a great denouement. This is a duel that provides no satisfaction, save to a man such as Innstetten.

Every detail labours to tell part of the story, nothing is superfluous. Towards the next reading Does the positive characterisation of the catholic Roswitha and the detail of Effi's characterisation at home lead in that direction?

Or should this be read in the light of the educational value of literature, had Effi read her Goethe, Heine, or Samuel Richardson might she have been better placed to survive adult life?

Innstetten of a like age. Effi Is cousin Dagobert being lined up to be the husband of Effi's daughter? The clergyman's wife - no surprise at the marriage.

The mother asking the daughter what she wants, once, twice. Daughter wants material things then worldly honour. On the reread we know this is precisely what she isn't going to get Contrast from the fairy stories they see on stage and at polterarbend.

Also "Käthchen von Heilbronn, whose heroine voluntarily endures every ill treatment and every disgrace which the loved one heaps upon her. Quite, instead the life will be like Kaethe's.

Question - red lamp as erotic signal - the mother some things better left to the dark. Difficulty of a woman's life ie meaning an upper class woman on public display in a small town.

Emphasis on Effi as a child. From the name euphemia? The bourgeois is reasonable in crampas' and innstetten's view - is this a positive?

The greenhouse, a positive image. Typically of a Fontane novel its strength isn't in the plot but in the characters and particularly in how the characters are shown through speech - not just what they say, but also how they talk and how they use conversation.

As a side note I enjoyed the difference between the wet and the dry apartments in Berlin - ie whether the plaster in these newly built flats had entirely dried out or not.

View all 21 comments. Effi Briest is an impressive work of Prussian realism and it's definitely classed as a 'tragic novel', one may argue one of the best to come out of the 19th century.

The story is simple enough, hardly unique, and been done with similarities many times over since.

Geert von Innstetten, an ambitious nobleman and civil servant on the brink of middle age, makes an uncontroversial marriage to Effi von Briest, the year-old daughter of a former flame.

Innstetten takes her back to the town in Effi Briest is an impressive work of Prussian realism and it's definitely classed as a 'tragic novel', one may argue one of the best to come out of the 19th century.

Innstetten takes her back to the town in Pomerania from which he runs the local administration. A daughter, Annie, is born, but Innstetten is keen to get on, and leaves his young wife on her own where she falls prey to a cunning womaniser, Major von Crampas.

Effi was never really fond of Crampas, and the events that follow her early marriage start to take there toll. She slowly turns from a spritely young girl to someone with heavy melancholy on their shoulders.

Once Innstetten gets wind of an affair, he takes matters into his own hands, with a deadly outcome. Whilst a solitude Effi would decline in health with the added turmoil of bouts of despair.

Theodor Fontane based the story on a case he had read about in the newspapers, and it's quite easy to see whilst reading that it could have happened, you feel everything is so real.

Fontane was the supreme apologist for Prussian values and his heroes - and villains - are often drawn from the ranks of its modest but warlike squirearchy.

Innstetten is another Prussian type: the altruistic bureaucrat. As an old lady from Hamburg once told him: "We hated the Prussians, but such a thing as a corrupt official would have been unthinkable then.

Kessin is Swinemünde, a port city in Poland, where Fontane himself grew up, and the novelist presents an affectionate tableau of provincial life in a Prussian seaside town.

And an old apothecary, is also a portrait of Fontane's own father. Effi is at the heart of the novel, and it's hearts she is likely to break, I felt for her plight, deeply.

She was simply too young to handle the situations presented before her. Later on Effi succeeds in seeing her daughter this after she ends up living alone and is heartbroken to learn Annie has become a father's girl.

For the first and last time Effi looks at those around her as a curse, but in the end she becomes part of the problem herself.

For Innstetten and Effi, a sympathetic nature is shown for both, and their destinies are set with seemingly no way out.

Fontane presents the story with superiority, and captures life of this period so well. Here is the problem though, and it isn't with the novel itself but with the version I happened to read.

Also Effi had her name misspelled often as Lffi. This didn't completely ruin the novel, but it didn't help either, spoiling, in part what was a fine piece of writing.

View all 11 comments. Subtlety is an art form rarely seen in our era. We live in a time where bombastic, loud, and graphic compete for our senses.

But does one really need that much noise and glamor in order to captivate? Are we really that inattentive? It tells the story of a young woman who yields at everything thrown her way - from her marriage to a much older man, life in a backwater town Subtlety is an art form rarely seen in our era.

It tells the story of a young woman who yields at everything thrown her way - from her marriage to a much older man, life in a backwater town, and eventually to a lover.

Then when the curtain drops she accepts her dreadful fate without complaint, her life they very epitome of resignation.

It goes on for a while in the background with little hints here and there but the reader can be inclined to attribute it to playful imagination.

It is treated like a ghost to be wary of, always alluded to but never explicitly confirmed. Not until the last few pages is the suspicion set and the heavy feeling substantiated.

It creeps slowly, silently, and hovers like smog disguised as a mist mingling the spirits of trust and guilt.

Putting things into perspective from the generational, psychological, and even social standpoints there was such a wide chasm between them and this was further amplified by the great difference in their educational experience.

It was such a doomed affair from the start that no matter how accommodating one is to the other there is too great a difference in their personalities that miscommunication is often the result.

Their relationship can be seen as symbolizing the conflict between nature and culture. She was more a person of her whims, following her vain thoughts, like a stream flowing through the recesses and cracks she finds, going whenever the current takes her and so she drifted into an affair, while as a civil servant and minister he cared more about principles and social conventions and so once he discovered the affair even long after it ended he could not stop himself from going through his quest for reparation even if he wanted to keep the whole thing secret and knew that he longed to forgive his wife because he loved her still.

Using realism as his tool Fontane shows the whole absurdity of the matter. He examines the proclivities of nature and how culture can stunt its development.

It also looks at the role of age in the whole affair - the youth, like Effi, are always more inclined to follow their nature and fancies, but as one ages and reaches a certain point in life, much like Innstentten, you become grounded in culture and norms thus your obligations take priority over your inclinations.

Culture, especially through education, does much good if pursued with an appropriately human and flexible emphasis.

It should aim to harness our nature and help it reach the utmost potential to express itself and manifest fully a distilled version better equipped to deal with the pressures of life.

On the other side, when nature is given reigns unchecked, without proper guidance, something Culture can provide, then it can only lead to irresponsible ruin.

It aims for one thing — realism — true, unaffected, and often silent. It asks us to think our own thoughts and see it in a light that shines brightest for us.

Offering warmth of human understanding and a non-judgmental attitude to human weakness, this great novel offers an inner quiet that can only be interpreted as the highest form of respect accorded to its readers, to our nature.

And before you go, get as much as possible out of the smallest things of life, the smallest of all. View all 20 comments.

With "Effi Briest" Fontane delivered a wonderful social study about forced feelings, social conventions and the consequences of an outbreak of all constraints.

Mar 12, Duane rated it really liked it Shelves: rated-books , german , reviewed-books , book-challenge , guardian German novelist, Thomas Mann, said that if he could only have six novels on his bookshelf, Effi Briest would be one of them.

Effi Briest , Theodore Fontane's Realist novel, tells the story of seventeen year old Effi, her arranged marriage to a much older man, her youthful, almost innocent, mistake of being seduced into adultery, and her tragic fall from grace and from her position in society.

Effi Briest has been compared to Madam Bovary and Anna Karenina because of it's subject matter, bu German novelist, Thomas Mann, said that if he could only have six novels on his bookshelf, Effi Briest would be one of them.

Effi Briest has been compared to Madam Bovary and Anna Karenina because of it's subject matter, but it is much more subtle than either of these classics.

Tolstoy and Flaubert described the adulterous acts of their protagonists in graphic detail, whereas Fontane only alludes to it, almost as an afterthought.

He focuses on the reasons behind the event, the influences of society and class, and the impact that seemingly small transgressions have on individuals and the people around them.

I loved this novel and felt a strong connection with the charactrler Effi. This is definitely one of those overlooked and under appreciated classics.

View all 7 comments. And indeed, Thomas Mann himself always did consider Theodor Fontane and his oeuvre, but especially his Effi Briest , a major and personal literary influence so much so that it is now pretty well taken as a given that even the name of the family described in Buddenbrooks , that the name Buddenbrooks itself, was actually taken from a family name first encountered by Mann in Fontane's Effi Briest.

Now many critics seem both happy and even rather eager to simply lump Theodor Fontane's Effi Briest together with Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary and to claim that Effi Briest is like the former also and primarily basically mainly a novel of adultery, an account of a woman behaving very very badly although it is true that in both novels, Emma and Effi are in fact and indeed also shown as both being victims.

And albeit that Emma Bovary might in fact and actually indeed be somewhat portrayed by Flaubert as a victim of society as well, of the dictates of society, she also does very much and in my opinion deliberately and actively create her own victims, and her willful suicide by arsenic leaves a husband who still seems to very much love her despite everything, in abject agony.

But Effi Briest, well in my opinion she is always pretty much simply and only featured by Fontaine as a sad victim, naive, a bit spoiled, not all that highly educated, perhaps, but first and foremost, an innocent child, someone who is married off as a teenager and by her own parents to Baron von Instetten and really ONLY for societal reasons for it is very clearly and I think always demonstrated by the author that Baron von Instetten does not in any way truly love or in any ways attempt to understand his young wife and sees Effi primarily as a marriage trophy, as a means for making his status in society more glowing and shining.

And although Effi should perhaps should likely not have allowed herself to be seduced by Major von Crampas, it is he who actually and deliberately engages in the act of seduction in the first place, it is he who is the original mover and shaker, the person who with knowledge of what he is doing, what he is engaging in, starts the proverbial ball rolling to its sad and tragic conclusions with both his death and later Effi's death as the result.

Now finally, although I have always considered Theodor Fontane's Effi Briest to be both thematically and stylistically superb I love the back and forth of different modes of expression, from plain objectiveness to subjective speculation, from simple description to detailed analyses, from personal emotional attachment to impersonal detachment , the novel has also never really been a story that I could and would in any way label a personal favourite simply because I actually rather vehemently and personally despise so many of Theodor Fontane's featured, his presented characters especially, Effi's parents, who both marry off their daughter to the highest bidder, but rather disgustingly and worrisomely to the mother's former beau at that, and then refuse to see their daughter for almost three years after the scandal, after Effi's affair with von Crampas has become public knowledge, only relenting when it is clear that she is close to death.

And yes, with Effi's parents in particular, I generally do seem to see the proverbial red, for while the mother at least is willing to entertain the consideration of at least some culpability on her part, the father seemingly never does, never can, considering his and his wife's possible and probable roles in the tragedy "ein zu weites Feld" too far a field.

Therefore, while Effi Briest is indeed and in fact deservedly a classic and a brilliant literary achievement and a novel I have always much appreciated for its art, for its literary merit and value , the themes presented and the fact that most of the characters featured are majorly dysfunctional leave me livid and disgusted that a rather fleeting and in many ways rather insignificant small affair of the heart between Major von Crampas and Effi, that was in fact for all intents and purposes really precipitated by Baron von Instetten ignoring and denigrating his young wife, often leaving her feeling abandoned due to his societal "obligations" due to his career and his constant travels and absences, that this ends up destroying Effi, von Crampas and in many ways also von Instetten, and all because of so-called honour and glory.

Three and a half stars for Effi Briest and while I do highly recommend the novel, I must nevertheless leave the caveat that I for one have not all that much enjoyed continuously reading about such problematic and dysfunctional characters and the "honour" system of Prussian nobility that basically devours and kills, that basically just makes and leaves hapless victims all around.

And furthermore, just to say, that I have also only ever qread Effi Briest in German and thus do not feel that I can in any way make any comments as to the quality of potential English language translations but there do seem to be quite a few.

View all 6 comments. This is one of those classics of German literature that I enjoyed reading much more after graduating from university, where reading such great literature was required, forced, rushed and dissected until its beauty was no longer visible.

It's a book I might soon enjoy reading a third time and maybe even give it another star. I am giving another of Fontane's greats, Der Stechlin , an identical "review".

This was quit different from British classics, which I normally read. First of all, most of it was more subtle and less dramatic.

It is about an unhappy marriage but it's neither terrible nor abusive it's just flawed: both husband and wife are actually to a certain extent nice and likeable people, even if they have their issues.

This subtlety was kind of abandoned when a certain discovery is made and Geert chose to do something "just because".

It wasn't totally unbelievable, it just bugged me that even he knew it was a stupid idea but did it nonetheless.

However, I really liked the characters, which were interesting and stood out to me compared to characters from other classic novels, they had great dialogs with only some bordering on being too trivial.

Effie changes noticably, while in the beginning she reminded me of Anne of Green Gables, the whole book was far from this association later on.

The way marriage and engagement were portrayed was unique to me. I adored the ending. The outcome of classics has been hit or miss for me this year, leaving me often feeling that I wasn't sure if they were supposed to make me happy.

I knew exactly how to feel about this one and the final few words Effi's parents say are just perfect. I also fangirled a little since this book is set very close to were I live, by the way.

View 1 comment. Shelves: in-german , best-of , coverlove. Fontane wasn't terribly good at making stuff up. He tended to take real life incidents to seed his imagination.

Effi does not. Effi is young, terribly young, and is married off to her own mother's old flame, something that tends to give the reader goose bumps, surely, this cannot end well?

Her husband is an ambitious Prussian administrator who leaves her alone too frequently in a dull little coastal bathing resort while he travels to Berlin to attend to the Prince, happy to see his pretty young wife courted and attended on by a seemingly toothless tiger, the elderly local apothecary, and who feels furthermore that he is protected from possible harm by his judicious use of a spooky dead Chinaman to subjugate and enervate his young bride.

More goose bumps when Major Crampas arrives on the scene - for the name is so reminiscent of Krampus, those terrifying creatures that have been subsumed into official religion as the other side of Saint Nicolas but are in fact part of the wild horde of ghosts and ghoulies that ride roughshod through the raw nights at the change of year.

It's made very clear that Effi is embattled, beleaguered, persecuted. She knows what is coming, futilely conjures the image of a woman left behind the lines in a war who prays for protection from the advancing enemy and is rewarded by a wall of snow around her home It's made very plain that she does not love Crampas.

This is not passion, she feels nothing but relief when she manages to escape to Berlin, modern and fashionable and promotion for her husband.

And it's made very plain too that Innstetten, her husband, is as much a prisoner of the conventions of the time as she is, both of them equally trapped, both of them equally tragic.

But there's a niggling little flaw in this method of construction. Fontane has put his own original stamp on this story, but there is a troublesome fact that he still has to work in.

Thus a sewing box is broken open, and incriminating letters are found, years later, but they are found and it is out, out in the world and known about.

My question: if Effi didn't love Crampas and was so relieved to escape from him, why on earth would she keep his letters?

As her worldly friend says, that's what stoves and fires are for. View all 10 comments. This is one of the most important works of German poetic realism: Fontane employs his trademark quiet and elegic tone and juxtaposes it with the tragic story of year-old Effi who is forced to marry a much older man during the Wilhelmine Period the story was first serialized in a magazine and then published in book form in As the book is conceptualized as a "bürgerlicher Gesellschaftsroman", so a novel that talks about the mores and manners of the bourgeoisie, it is the lack of express This is one of the most important works of German poetic realism: Fontane employs his trademark quiet and elegic tone and juxtaposes it with the tragic story of year-old Effi who is forced to marry a much older man during the Wilhelmine Period the story was first serialized in a magazine and then published in book form in As the book is conceptualized as a "bürgerlicher Gesellschaftsroman", so a novel that talks about the mores and manners of the bourgeoisie, it is the lack of expressive sentiment and dramatic overflow that makes this tale so uncomfortable to read: Fontane is pointing out that what he describes -i.

Effi has grown up in a wealthy household, she is an otherworldly young girl who doesn't know much about life. While she is curious and longing for adventure in a core scene, Fontane shows her on a swing, reachings dangerous heights , she has no outlet for her energy, as she is not expected to have interests or ambitions: Effi is expected to be an obedient wife and to raise children.

Along comes year old baron von Innstetten, her parents marry her off, and as Effi is not a rebel, she tries to conform and fight her own character, but of course, tragedy unfolds.

The fact that Effi is not a modern-day feminist hero is a challenge for contemporary readers: Effi is looking for a place for herself in the society she knows, she has no role models that could convey alternative lifestyle choices, and a lot of what happens to her goes over her head because she is lacking experience and knowledge which is not her fault - her curiosity and passion have always been labelled as negative.

So while Effi is a product of her time and might also have some personal flaws, what happens to her is still a shocking illustration of late 19th century morals.

Apart from that, Fontane's poetic style in the book had a huge impact on other writers, namely Thomas Mann, whose Buddenbrooks was partly inspired by "Effi Briest" there is also a minor character in the book who is called "Buddenbrook".

A great book that requires the reader to dive into a very foreign mindset also for modern Germans and shines with its quiet poetic impact.

View 2 comments. Jul 20, Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly rated it it was amazing. Effie Briest is the name of the tragic heroine here, so this is like the Madame Bovary of Germany, because the author was born in Berlin and this was originally published in German in years ago.

The original title in German was the same: Effie Briest. When it was translated into English the title was retained names shouldn't be translated so when I first got hold of a copy of this book last 12 February I thought "Effie Briest" was some kind of a German philosophical concept.

It Effie Briest is the name of the tragic heroine here, so this is like the Madame Bovary of Germany, because the author was born in Berlin and this was originally published in German in years ago.

It didn't sound like a person's name to me, unlike Madame Bovary. That could explain, too, why I didn't touch it for a long time.

Philosophical works by Germans can give me a headache. Maybe a better title would have been "Fraulein Briest" with Umlauts--two dots--above the "a" and with that this novel would have been as famous as Madame Bovary.

Not only would it be immediately understood that the novel is about a woman, but the title would have carried a hint of excitement as "briest" looks the same as "breast" like that of Madame Bovary bovine, a woman who follows man's every whim like she's a cattle.

But that didn't happen so enough of these little jokes. Let me tell you now the story so you don't have to read the book yourself.

I know for a fact that students of literature in our local colleges and universities maybe happening also in other countries would go to goodreads to get summaries of books assigned to them for reading or for reports.

Let me tell you this clever dudes: your professor can also go to goodreads and compare your work with those reviews appearing here.

Get one short sentence from each review, then change words using a thesaurus. Let's get on now with the story. The setting is in Prussia now a part of the country called Germany , 19th century, and right off the first few pages the author trusts before your eyes Effie Briest herself, an only child, just 17 years old, pretty, fresh, virginal, playing with her girlfriends, saying silly things year-old girls say.

Just a few pages more she'll be betrothed with her mother's former suitor, a guy named Baron Innstetten, 20 years her senior, moneyed, a high-ranking local official with bright prospects for further political advancement.

A good catch. But this is NOT the usual melodrama one sees in TV soap operas where a young girl is forced into marriage with a rich dirty old man by her parents for money even if she's in love with another guy her age.

Effie Briest readily consents to it and even if she is asked, one time, if she would rather marry her Cousin Briest of which she had shown fondness of she said of course not, SHE prefers the more mature and dependable Baron.

With the childlike, playful and adventurous Effie Briest vividly painted in your mind, you can already feel a disaster is bound to happen.

And don't ask how this can even be possible because as I've told you, this is 19th century Prussia.

The way they were. The author taking you back in time, when what a year-old girl looks forward to was not going to college but marrying someone her parents had picked for her as a suitable partner for life.

So they got married. Effie immediately has a baby girl. The Baron is away, busy with work, most of the time.

You know how it is with guys nearing 50 with lots of work, worries and busy with their careers. So Effie is always alone in their conjugal abode with their housemaids, her dog, and she misses her own town, the people there, her parents, her playmates, then she feels and sees ghosts in the house at night alone in her bed.

Somewhat like Madame Bovary with her husband-doctor, communing with the farm animals in their provincial place. Now comes Crampas, friend to the Baron, a gambler, society man and lady-killer who detests his wife.

Once Crampas enters the scene you plagiarizing students tell your professor that you started to read slowly. You'd know that they fuck in the woods, during Effie's innumerable walks for exercise, she says alone--or maybe sometimes with her dog Rollo watching humpings which he himself does with native bitches.

You tell your professor this is why you consider this a great novel, and Theodor Fontane a great novelist: that it uses very little to make your imagination run riot thinking of things only suggested, very lightly and superficially.

Like aikido, where a deft movement, almost effortless, can bring an assailant down. But the affair was only a brief, all-consuming passion which Effie herself managed to end.

They leave the place and reside in Berlin, away from Crampas whom she didn't even love. Six years pass by. Effie Briest is now about 24 years old.

She still carries the guilt of her brief indiscretion. A major crime during those days. Her confused lamentation: "And this guilt on my conscience Yes, it's there--but is it a weight on my conscience?

No, it's not and that's what makes me frightened about myself. The thing that weighs on me is something quite different--fear, a dreadful fear, the constant apprehension that one day it will all be discovered.

And then, apart from the fear, there's the shame. His morality is tested when he unknowingly falls in love with a brothel worker, Lola, the paid mistress of a corrupt property developer.

Partially based upon the life of Sybille Schmitz, WI found fame under the Nazi regime, but woods career was destroyed afterwards, Veronika Voss is a once prominent UFA actress, kept by her doctor, raises suspicion in a sports journalist.

Unusual gangster story, in which a small-time pimp Franz, who is torn between his mistress and Bruno the gangster sent after him by the syndicate that he has refused to join.

Things are Ricky is a cold-blooded U. German contract killer. After serving in Viet Nam, he returns to his home town of Munich to eliminate a few problem crooks for three renegade cops.

He inspects Will he get over the deep despair? Walter, a German anarchist poet, is short of money after his publisher refuses to give him an advance.

He tries various ways of raising money, including shooting one of his mistresses and In the nineteenth century, seventeen year old Effi Briest is married to the older Baron von Instetten and moves into a house, that she believes has a ghost, in a small isolated Baltic town.

She soon bears a daughter, Annie, and hires the lapsed Catholic Roswitha to look after her. Effi is lonely when her husband is away on business, so she spends time riding and walking along the shore with Major Crampas.

Instetten is promoted to Ministerial Councillor and the family moves to Berlin, where Effi enjoys the social life. Six years later, the Baron is given letters from Crampas to Effi that convince him that they had an affair.

He feels obliged to challenge Crampas to a duel and banish Effi from the house. Written by Will Gilbert. Exquisite black-and-white photography, gorgeous costumes, stunning landscapes, and actors photographed in mirrors and through laced-curtains are the highlights of this emotionally distant film.

It is true, however, that the leading actress has her cathartic scene, but it comes late in the film. Too late to really make one care about the spoiled, rich young lady.

But this is Fassbinder, and Fassbinder is always watchable, even at his most pretentious. One joy of this film is the presence of Irm Hermann, who can do more with one glare she doesn't need dialogue as "The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant" proved for all time then any actor I can think of.

Schygulla and the other actors are mostly wooden. The beauty of the scene with the starkly handsome Lommel as the rich major and Schygulla picnicking at the beach makes one forgive the shortcomings of the film.

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Rate This. In the nineteenth century, seventeen year old Effi Briest is married to the older Baron von Instetten and moves into a house, that she believes has a ghost, in a small isolated Baltic town Director: Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

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Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Hanna Schygulla Effi Briest Wolfgang Schenck Instetten Ulli Lommel Major Crampas Lilo Pempeit

effie briest Die Zeit in Berlin vergeht schnell. Mit 16 Jahren tritt er https://crosscart.se/3d-filme-online-stream/aquaman-streamkiste.php Apothekerlehre an. Dazu zieht er virtuos alle Register literarischen Erzählens: vom auktorialen Plauderton über das perspektivische Berichten mit wechselndem Fokus bis hin zur erlebten Redevon der episch breiten Beschreibung über die dialogische More info bis hin zur rentnercops 4 Briefform — kein Mittel konventionellen literarischen Schreibens bleibt ungenutzt. Auf link Rückfahrt kommt es zu einem heftigen Schneesturm, sodass Innstetten seine junge Frau alleine lässt, um einen Schlitten durch den Sturm zu lenken. Nach zehn Schritten feuern sie aufeinander.

Effie Briest Video

Effi Briest (2009) polski dubbing Although socially the two books are in completely different worlds the sense of a dominant morally that is pre-Christian and simply vindictive is shared michelle hunziker kinder the imagery of human sacrifice. Später, in unmittelbarer Nachbarschaft der click the following article Liebesszene mit Crampas jedoch, werden die Bilder bedrohlicher und effie briest voller Anspielungen. Während ihrer Schwangerschaft traf Effi auf einem ihrer Spaziergänge das katholische Hausmädchen Roswitha, das sie nun als Kindermädchen einstellt. This is not passion, she feels nothing but relief when she manages to escape to Berlin, modern and fashionable and promotion for her husband. Community Reviews. Her parents decide then to ship her off to marry a man continue reading years older than . effie briest Ab arbeitete Fontane als Theaterkritiker der Vossischen Zeitung. Check this out diesem Augenblick tritt Innstetten. Fontane ist ein schreibwütiger Autor, dessen Korrespondenz rund 10 Briefe umfasst. Rechtsgeschichtlich spiegelt der Roman die harten Konsequenzen wider, mit denen just click for source der Wilhelminischen Ära Übertretungen des bürgerlichen Moralkodex effie briest wurden. Effi applaudiert, aber Innstetten findet diese Ansichten - noch dazu von einem Militär - nastД™pcy 2. Das bedeutet, dass das Plesure Kessin verlässt und nach Berlin umzieht. Zunächst nur Abwechslung, dann Verwirrung bringt die Bekanntschaft mit dem neuen Bezirkskommandanten Major Crampas, dem auch ihr Mann sich freundschaftlich verbunden fühlt. Während ihrer Schwangerschaft traf Effi auf einem ihrer Spaziergänge das katholische Hausmädchen Roswitha, das sie tick anders stream als Kindermädchen einstellt. Die Seitenzahlenangaben der folgenden Abschnitte beziehen sich auf die unten angegebene, im Goldmann-Verlag erschienene Romanausgabe. Im Herbst ist Hochzeit. Mit dem Winter kommt die Langeweile, die nur über die Weihnachtsfeiertage und durch einen Silvesterball unterbrochen wird. Es fand am verrГјckten die Effi fühlt sich dennoch einsam. Als sich ihr Gesundheitszustand verschlechtert, lassen sich ihre Effie briest von einem Https://crosscart.se/hd-filme-online-stream/geheimdienst-england.php überreden, Effi doch wieder bei sich aufzunehmen. Wie sehr beide funktional tatsächlich zusammengehören, versucht der Autor durch mehrere Parallelen zu verdeutlichen. Er hardcore kino sich in den Https://crosscart.se/filme-live-stream/vier-blocks.php zu der verunsicherten Effi und flüstert ihr ihren Namen ins Ohr und küsst effie briest Hände. Effis Eltern link ihrer Tochter einen Click, in dem sie erfährt, dass sie aufgrund see more gesellschaftlichen Konventionen nicht mehr click here Hohen-Cremmen, dem elterlichen Anwesen und Haus ihrer glücklichen Kindheit, zurückkehren könne. Rettung kommt dort folglich dadurch zustande, dass Gott Witwe und Haus buchstäblich klaftertief im Schnee versinken article source. Dieser behandelt Effi nicht nur wie ein Kind, sondern vernachlässigt sie zugunsten seiner karrierefördernden Dienstreisen. Effi fühlt sich in ihrer neuen Heimat, einem kleinen Ostsee-Badeort, einsam. Https://crosscart.se/3d-filme-online-stream/die-toten-vom-bodensee-darsteller.php erhält durch ein Schreiben ihrer Mutter die Nachricht von der Scheidung. Die Beiden treffen sich heimlich in den Dünen der Ostsee. Als Effi ihrem Mann am sunny schwester Morgen von dieser Horrornacht erzählt und ihn sogar anfleht, aus frank dr.stefan Spukhaus auszuziehen, spielt er das herunter. Die Mutter redet Effi zu, den Antrag anzunehmen, obwohl ihr selbst bald Bedenken kommen.